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When you think about the automaker McLaren, you think of powerful, good looking fast cars. Their new flagship car, the McLaren P1 is no different. The McLaren P1 is a limited production plug-in hybrid sports car by British automotive manufacturer McLaren Automotive. The concept car debuted at the 2012 Paris Motor Show. Deliveries to retail customers began in the UK in October 2013. The entire P1 production of 375 units was sold out by November 2013. It is considered to be the long-awaited successor to the legendary McLaren F1, which was way ahead of its time, utilizing hybrid power and Formula 1 technology. It does not have the same three seat layout as its predecessor. The design of the headlights is very similar to the shape of the McLaren logo. Just like the McLaren F1 road car of 1992, the McLaren P1 is a mid-engine, rear-wheel drive design that uses a carbon fibre monocoque and roof structure safety cage concept called MonoCage, which is a development of the MonoCell used in the current MP4-12C and MP4-12C Spider upgrade that came out in early 2012. The P1 features a 3.8-litre twin-turbocharged V8 petrol engine that is only similar to the MP4-12C motor in its displacement. The twin turbos boost the petrol motor at 2.4 bar to deliver 727 bhp (542 kW) and 719 Nm (531 lb ft) at 7500 rpm, combined with an in-house developed electric motor producing 176 bhp (131 kW) and 260 Nm (192 lb ft). With both motors, the P1 will have a total power and torque output of 903 bhp (916 PS) and 978 Nm (722 lb ft) respectively. The electric motor can be deployed manually by the driver or left in automatic mode, whereby the car’s ECUs ‘torque fill’ the gaps in the petrol motor’s output, which is considered turbo lag. This gives the power-train an effective power band of almost 7000rpm.The car is rear-wheel drive with a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. The seven speed dual-clutch is a star of the car, it is just so fast and crisp. Power for the electric motor is stored in a 324-cell lithium-ion high density battery pack located behind the cabin, developed by Johnson Matthey Battery Systems. The battery can be charged by the engine or through a plug-in equipment and can be fully charged in two hours. The car can be operated using either the petrol engine, the electric motor or with a combination of the two. The P1 has an all-electric range of at least 10 km (6.2 mi) on the combined European drive cycle. The P1 comes with Formula 1 derived features such as the Instant Power Assist System (IPAS), which will give an instant boost in acceleration via the electric motor, a Drag Reduction System (DRS) which operates the car’s rear wing, thereby increasing straight line speed, and a KERS. Both of these features (IPAS, DRS) are operated via two buttons on the steering wheel. The P1 will go from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.8 seconds, 0 to 200 km/h (124 mph) in 6.8 seconds, and 0 to 300 km/h (186 mph) in 16.5 seconds, making it a full 5.5 seconds faster than the McLaren F1. It completes a standing quarter mile in 9.8 seconds at 152 mph (245 km/h). Top speed is electronically limited to 217 mph (349 km/h). The P1 has a dry weight of 1,395 kg (3,075 lb), giving it a power-to-weight ratio of 647 bhp/tonne. It has a kerb weight of 1,490 kg (3,280 lb) which translates to of 606 bhp/tonne. The P1 also features bespoke Pirelli P-Zero Corsa tyres and specially developed carbon-ceramic brakes from Akebono. It takes 6.2 seconds to brake from 186 mph (299 km/h) to standstill, during which it will cover 246 metres. From 60 mph (97 km/h), it will cover 30.2 metres. The car is made from a lot of carbon fibre, the chassis, the passenger tube are all mode of carbon fibre, making it very light and therefore agile. The front splitter, diffuser and the super aggressive wing gives it great stability and downforce. The new age of super cars have changed, the LaFarrari, Porsche 918 and the McLaren P1 all feature and electric and gas engine which gives a new level of power and a new generation of cars.

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